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GOODWILL WINE

We sat down and had a virtual Rosé with David, Founder of Goodwill wines, to chat bushfires, the perfect man and how it all began.  Pour yourself a large one, put your feet up... and enjoy. 

If you could be any wine/blend, what would you be and why?

I'd be a GSM. I love the thought process behind blended wines and frankly, I love mongrels. I think blended wines are the underdog of the wine world yet by taking the best qualities of single varieties a talented winemaker can create something that is so much greater than the sum of its parts. I choose a GSM because I like the funky, forest floor grit of a Grenache, the strength of a Shiraz and the mysterious old world spices of Mataro. Together they are heaven and I think they would make for a pretty impressive bloke!    

What was the reason for starting Goodwill Wine and what is the aim behind it?

Ten years ago I lost most of what I owned in the Black Saturday bushfires. I was grateful to be alive and incredibly humbled at how Australians stepped up to help. Because of the money people dropped into donation tins around the country, I was able to start again. I made it my mission to “pay forward” the incredible generosity shown to me. I started a business that gave back 50% of everything I earned, and I gave it to the charities my customers cared most about. I loved wine, and I had awesome contacts at some great vineyards who agreed to help. And so with the $15,000 given to me, Goodwill Wine was born. Since then we have given back over $250,000. 

Tell us a little about you, as the founder of Goodwill Wines

I'm a single dad living in rural Victoria. I define myself as a father first and foremost and a business owner second. I'm an active volunteer firefighter in my town's fire brigade and try to lead a simple life. I like hard work and I miss my sleep.  

How can others help to pay it forward like you have, in our day-to-day lives?

It's really simple to pay things forward and I think so many of us are doing it anyway. Besides being good to one another, we are all paying it forward with our purchase decisions. Is the product you are buying adding something extra to the world beyond making you happy? Is it solving a genuine local or global problem as well as the specific personal problem that you bought it for in the first place? The Ahimsa Collective bags are a perfect example of a product providing both solutions. It's kind of a no-brainer and the generations that are following the ones who created all the problems in the world can see this and are incorporating these questions into every aspect of their lives. These are the people who are going to repair all the damage that has been done and they are doing it with their wallets or their Ahimsa coin purse :)  

Who do you support and why, through your sales? 

I don't support any one cause; I support hundreds. And it's my customer's who tell me which ones to send my profits to. I have my personal favourites that I would choose if I was buying my wine; such as Animals Australia or the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre. I love that we have been able to fund 3 international animal cruelty investigations for Animals Australia and put hot meals into the bellies of over 3,000 people seeking asylum here in Australia. But there are so many other good causes to support.   

What do you hope to see change throughout the next year in terms of giving and movement in both humans and environmental issues

I hope the philanthropic trend continues with Millennials and they begin to hold positions of power and influence. Sadly, I think the jury is in for those that 'went before' and it's going to take those left with the problems to have to solve them. There is a general awakening in society and people are demanding more from businesses and they are voting with their wallets. No longer can a business send employees to volunteer for a day at a local charity and then shout out how amazing they are to the heavens. No one is listening to that tokenism any more. Social enterprise is becoming a core value demanded by consumers and the businesses that don't genuinely embrace it will fall by the wayside. And so they should.   

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